fb-art  instagram-2  linkedin_logo  twitt_logo

youtue 

  

constituion1

boardroom_menu

 

 


amazon_smile

 


 

taper_header

Home | Elementary School | Middle School | High School | SLCs/Academies/Magnets 

SLCs/Academies/Magnets

Law-Related Career Center

Government


Prosecutor

Prosecutors are lawyers for the city, county, state, or federal government who represent the public in prosecuting criminal cases. Below shows the prosecutor offices at each level:
City level (city attorney’s office)
County level (district attorney’s office)
State level (state attorney general’s office)
Federal level (U.S. attorney’s office)

The responsibilities of prosecutors include representing the state at trial, interviewing witnesses, questioning witnesses in court, filing charges, negotiating plea bargains, and making sure that law enforcement has gathered sufficient evidence against the defendant(s).

Education
Prosecutors must have a bachelor’s degree and a law degree. They must maintain a current license to practice law and also complete any additional courses or training required. (See Lawyers) Many prosecutors go through 10 weeks of training after their initial hiring. Those in special divisions (e.g., gang specialists) often attend seminars and conferences in their area of expertise. The qualifications of a federal prosecutor often include prior work as a law firm associate or county or city prosecutor.

In May 2010, the median annual pay of lawyers was $112,760, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Entry-level prosecutor salaries are much lower than the median salary for lawyers generally. 

hearts_prosecutor

Public Defender

Public defenders are lawyers who represent indigent defendants, or those who cannot afford a private attorney, in criminal cases. They may work at the level of county, state, or federal government. Their responsibility is solely to their client.

Their responsibilities include representing clients at trial, interviewing witnesses, questioning witnesses in court, negotiating plea bargains, maintaining confidentiality of their clients, and advising clients about the law.

Education
Public defenders must have a bachelor’s degree and a law degree. They must maintain a current license to practice law. Many attend seminars and conferences in their area of expertise and any additional training required by their employer. In California, the state defender’s office handles only appeals in death-penalty cases. All trials are handled by county-level public defenders. The qualifications of a federal public defender often include prior work as a law firm associate or county or city public defender.

In May 2010, the median annual pay of lawyers was $112,760, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Entry-level public defender salaries are much lower than the median salary for lawyers generally. 

Legislative Staffer

Legislative staffers work in either a state legislature or Congress. Their immediate employer is an elected official (senator, state senator, representative, or assembly person). Legislative staffers tend to specialize in specific issues, helping their employer by monitoring bills and committee meetings in their area of focus. Their duties include research, drafting floor speeches, and responding to constituent questions and concerns.

Education
A college degree is required to be a legislative staffer. Often, staffers begin as interns in a politician’s office. For more competitive positions, such as those in the offices of U.S. senators, legislative staffers might also need a master’s degree (e.g., public policy) and years of work experience.

Salary
Salaries for federal legislative staffers working in the U.S. Senate average slightly under $50,000 and a little over $40,000 in the House. State legislative staffer salaries vary widely due to differing legislative demands, time on the job, and living costs across the nation. National averages put income for this position at about $16,000 on the low end and $70,000 on the high end, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Photo: Mark Ide