fb-art  instagram-2  linkedin_logo  twitt_logo

youtue 

 

constituion1

boardroom_menu

 

 


amazon_smile2


 
BRIA 9 3 and 4

CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS FOUNDATION
Bill of Right in Action
Summer 1993 (9:3 & 4)
Updated July 2000
 

The Legislative Branch

Central to the success of our system of government is Congress. The framers of the Constitution viewed this branch as the most important. Representing the will of the people, and the sovereignty of the states, it would be strong enough to regulate the nations' trade and provide the defense without abusing its power.

Today, the role of Congress has expanded beyond the founders' wildest imagination. Many critics claim that Congress no longer works. They believe it is controlled by special interest, more concerned with member's perks than with the nation's best interest, and bogged down in partisan politics.

In this edition of Bill of Rights in Action, we conclude our series on America's basic governmental and political institutions with a historical and contemporary look at the legislative branch.

U.S. History: "Let us Reason Together" Lyndon Johnson, Master Legislator

World History: The European Community: Cooperating Nations or Unified Superstates

U.S. Government: A Different Voice: Women in the Congress

Officers: Alan Friedman, President; Harry Usher, Immediate Past President; Publications Committee: Jerome C. Byrne, Chairperson; Peggy Saferstein, Marvin Sears, Eugene Shutler, Lloyd M. Smith, Marjorie Steinberg, Susan Troy, Daniel H Willick; Staff: Todd Clark, Executive Director; Marshall L. Croddy, Director of Program and Materials Development; Lisa Friedman, Associate Director of Program and Materials Development; Carlton Martz, Writer; Charles Degelman, Editor; Cristy Lytal, Web Editor; Andrew Costly, Production Manager; Peggy Saferstein, CRF Board Reviewer.

© 1993, Constitutional Rights Foundation, 601 South Kingsley Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90005,  (213) 487-5590